Appendix

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This section is up to date for TED Notepad version 6.1.1.0.

The meaning of some terms used in this manual is as follows below:


  • An alphanum is an alpha-numeric character, i.e. a, b, ..., z; A, B, ..., Z; 0, 1, ..., 9.
    • Special characters like á (a with acute) belong to alphanums only in certain locale settings. To be able to recognize these characters as alphanums you need to use CTYPE category of a locale that supports it. TED Notepad always works with the current system locale settings.
  • A digit is any digit recognized by Unicode, i.e. 1, ..., 9, but also ¹, ², ³, etc.
  • A capital is any capital letter, i.e. A, B, ..., Z. These are called letters in upper letter case or simply upper case letters. Their oposites are called lower case letters and are in lower letter case or simply in lower case.
    • Special characters like Á (A with acute) belong to capitals only in certain locale settings. To be able to recognize these characters as capitals you need to use CTYPE category of a locale that supports it. TED Notepad always works with the current system locale settings.
  • There are also other types of characters recognized by TED notepad:
    • A punctuation character is any character recognized by Unicode as meant for punctuation purposes, e.g. quotation marks.
    • A control character is a character from the very beginning of the ASCII table. These have special meaning and should be either avoided or treated with care.




  • A line is a sequence of characters, where two lines are divided by one newline. Note that if Word Wrap is turned on, a line may be visually wrapped into several visual lines, but within all tools and most features it will still be treated as a single unbroken line. Any current visual word-wrapping has seldom impact on how lines are treated within tools and features .


  • A sentence is a sequence of characters that begins with a capital and ends with a Dot, a Question mark or an Exclamation mark. Example: Alice? Who the f... is Alice? are two sentences, but Alice? Who the f... Is Alice? are three sentences. Unfortunatelly, even How are you today, Mr. President? is considered as two sentences.


  • A line column is part of line, which meets certain column criteria. As these column criteria are applied to subsequent lines, they determine a logical column of text over these lines. The criteria are applied to individual lines independently, thus possibly determining a column of text, which may be visually hard to identify. Nevertheless, for each individual line, the column criteria are met.
    • Note: A line column is always one solid line portion, i.e. one line column can never consist of two separate portions of the same line. This is because a line column is a logical part of line, it only specifies where it begins and where it ends on each line.
    • Applicable column criteria may change from feature to feature and from tool to tool, but they usually include:
      • Dividing each line into portions using delimiting characters, also called delimiters. These delimiting characters are located within each line and the line is split into portions. A splitting point occurs at any of these characters. These portions are numbered. The criteria then specify, which consequtive portions are to be selected for the line column. Note: Delimiting characters enclosing the selected portions are not included within the line column, but any delimiting characters between the selected portions are naturally included.
      • Dividing each line into portions using a delimiting phrase. In contrast to the delimiting characters, delimiting phrase is always located within each line as a whole sequence of characters, not as a set of individual and interchangeable characters. The line is split into numbered portions wherever this whole delimiting phrase is found. The criteria then specify, which consequtive portions are to be selected for the line column. Note: Delimiting phrases enclosing the selected portions are not included within the line column, but any delimiting phrases between the selected portions are naturally included.
      • Taking only a portion of each line based on a range of characters. A range of characters is simply a starting and an ending point within the line. All characters between the starting and ending points are selected for the line column.
      • Certain combinations of the above criteria can be used to further reduce the column. For example, a set of delimiting characters can be used to split the line and select only the second part, and then a range of characters can be used to further reduce that part at its beginning and/or at its end. Note that these criteria are applied in sequence and their results compound, i.e. later criteria obey prior criteria and never try to reach outside of boundaries set by preceding criteria.


  • An actual insertion point (also called a current caret location) is a position of the caret in the documnet. It is also the end of the actual selection, if any. Note that the end of the selection is where the user stops selecting the text, therefore if selecting text upwards, the selection end visually preceeds the selection beginning.


  • To unique lines is to remove duplicate lines, to unify them. If lines or words have been uniqued, it means that each line (or word) is unique in the results and that no two lines (or words) are of the same text.
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