Edit menu

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This section is up to date for TED Notepad version 6.1.1.0.
Control page Control:menu:Edit menu
This section is up to date for TED Notepad version 6.1.1.0.
Control page Control:menu:Edit


Undo (Ctrl+Z)

Undoes the last action.

Note: By default, Undo remembers all executed actions, thus one can revoke as many actions as necessary. This unlimited multi-level undo queue can be, however, be either temporarily ignored by using Simple Undo instead Undo, or turned off completely by Suppress multi-level Undo/Redo setting in the Settings dialog. See chapter Edit page of the Settings dialog.

Note: Current multi-level undo queue can be automatically discarded upon Save operation, using Reduce Undo/Redo upon Save setting in the Settings dialog. See chapter Edit page of the Settings dialog.

Note: The unsaved modifications indicator is aware of how Undo and Redo are used to revoke actions and responds intuitively. If a state of the document text is reached thru Undo and/or Redo that was last known upon Open or Save operation.

See also Simple Undo and Redo.

Redo (Ctrl+Y)

Redoes the last undone action.

Note: Redo is, as expected, only available after Undo, until no other document-content-modifying operation is performed.

See also Undo and Simple Undo.

Simple Undo (Alt+BkSpace)

Performs Undo or Redo, depending on whether there is something to Redo.

Note: This can be used to emulate a simple single-level Undo command known from older version of TED Notepad.

Note: Unlimited multi-level undo queue can be turned off completely by Suppress multi-level Undo/Redo setting in the Settings dialog. See chapter Edit page of the Settings dialog.

See also Undo and Redo.

Cut (Ctrl+X) (Shift+Del)

Cuts the selection into the system Clipboard.

Auto-select upon Cut with empty selection

The Auto-select upon Copy with empty selection allows to automatically select nearby text, if Copy, Cut or Swap is invoked while nothing is selected. The amount of text automatically selected can be set in the Settings dialog. See chapter Clipboard page of the Settings dialog.

See also Copy, Paste and Swap.

Copy (Ctrl+C) (Ctrl+Ins)

Copies the selection into the system Clipboard.

Auto-select upon Copy with empty selection

The Auto-select upon Copy with empty selection allows to automatically select nearby text, if Copy, Cut or Swap is invoked while nothing is selected. The amount of text automatically selected can be set in the Settings dialog. See chapter Clipboard page of the Settings dialog.

See also Cut, Paste and Swap.

Paste (Ctrl+V) (Shift+Ins)

Pastes the content of the system Clipboard to the actual insertion point or replaces the selection, if any.

Tip: There is much better way to move text around the doument than using old-fashioned copy-paste methods. See Recently Deleted and Recently Inserted for swifter ways of cut'n'pasting things around. Also Complete Word and Complete Line could come more handy than abusing the system Clipboard in many many cases.

It usually takes some time to switch old habits for new methods, but I do guarantee this is worth trying.

Mimic case

Paste can try to mimic character case of text being replaced upon pasting. If Mimic original case upon Paste setting is turned on, character case of the actual selection is examined before pasting, and then the character case of the system Clipboard is auto-converted upon pasting. See chapter Clipboard page of the Settings dialog.

Note: The character case conversion within text from the system Clipboard does not modify the system Clipboard content. The conversion is applied onto the text while replacing the selection, after retreiving it from the system Clipboard.

Tip: The Mimic original case upon Paste setting recognizes only basic types of character case, i.e. lower case, upper case, word capitals, first capital. Everyting else is considered mixed case and is not converted. This can be utilized to specify one mixed case version for pasting. Consider you need to paste OneHalf, but want to use the mimic case to automatically convert it to onehalf or ONEHALF where appropriate. Using mixed case OneHalf will do the trick.

See also Cut, Copy and Swap.

Swap (Ctrl+K) (Ctrl+Shift+Ins)

Cuts the selection into the system Clipboard while pasting previous Clipboard content instead of it into the document.

Note: If no selection is found, works the same way as Paste does, unless Auto-select upon Copy with empty selection is turned on as described below.

Tip: It is useful to rotate several text pieces within the document without having to put one of them aside for a while. Imagine that you have two words you need to swap. Select the first of them, use Copy and then use Swap (hotkey Ctrl+K) on the other one. Finally, go back to the first one and use Paste. This way you can rotate as many things as necessary.

Tip: There is much better way to move text around the doument than using old-fashioned copy-paste methods. See Recently Deleted and Recently Inserted for swifter ways of cut'n'pasting things around. Also Complete Word and Complete Line could come more handy than abusing the system Clipboard in many many cases.

It usually takes some time to switch old habits for new methods, but I do guarantee this is worth trying.

Auto-select upon Swap with empty selection

The Auto-select upon Copy with empty selection allows to automatically select nearby text, if Copy, Cut or Swap is invoked while nothing is selected. The amount of text automatically selected can be set in the Settings dialog. See chapter Clipboard page of the Settings dialog.

See also Cut, Copy and Paste.


Recently Deleted (Ctrl+Q)

Inserts recently deleted text into the document.

Note: The recently deleted text is determined from the Undo queue as the most recent text deletion entry. This results in few small hitches:

  1. If the Undo queue is emptied (e.g. upon Save with appropriate setting option), recently deleted text can no longer be re-inserted.
  2. Undo/Redo commands modify the Undo queue, and thus may potentially alter what Recently Deleted command returns. This is specifically apparent, if you try to delete something, then undo the deletion, and then want to insert it elsewhere as recently deleted — it is not possible, since the text is no longer recently deleted — the deletion was undone. Use Recently Inserted instead, or perhaps combine Recently Deleted with Recently Inserted to copy text around without copy/pasting thru Clipboard.

See also Recently Inserted.

Recently Inserted (Ctrl+J)

Inserts recently inserted text into the document.

Note: The recently inserted text is determined from the Undo queue as the most recent text insertion entry. The text itself is, however, not stored in the undo entry, and is rather taken directly from the document. This results in few small hitches:

  1. If the document is further modified in the place where the recently inserted text is supposed to appear, e.g. by deleting some characters after insertion, it can no longer be retreived. Note: The funny thing about this is that if you'd undo the troubling deletion, then retreival would start working again. This is because the Undo/Redo commands actively modify the queue, which determines these conditions.
  2. If the Undo queue is emptied (e.g. upon Save with appropriate setting option), recently inserted text can no longer be re-inserted.
  3. Undo/Redo commands modify the Undo queue, and thus may potentially alter what Recently Inserted command returns. If Undo/Redo commands can take you back and forth in time of your edits, both Recently Deleted and Recently Inserted commands adapt likewise.

See also Recently Deleted.

File Name (F6)

Inserts file name of the current document, exactly as it is shown in the main window caption.

See also Full Path.

Full Path (Ctrl+F6)

Inserts full path and file name of the current document.

See also File Name.

Time/Date (F5)

Inserts current system time and date using the short date format specified in the Local Settings (e.g. Control Panel of My Computer).

See also Date, Date/Time, Time/Date, Long Date, Long Date/Time and Time/Long Date.

Time/Long Date (Shift+F5)

Inserts current system time and date using the long date format specified in the Local Settings (e.g. Control Panel of My Computer).

See also Date, Date/Time, Time/Date, Long Date, Long Date/Time and Time/Long Date.

Date/Time (Alt+F5)

Inserts current system date and time using the short date format specified in the Local Settings (e.g. Control Panel of My Computer).

See also Date, Date/Time, Time/Date, Long Date, Long Date/Time and Time/Long Date.

Long Date/Time (Alt+Shift+F5)

Inserts current system date and time using the long date format specified in the Local Settings (e.g. Control Panel of My Computer).

See also Date, Date/Time, Time/Date, Long Date, Long Date/Time and Time/Long Date.

Date (Ctrl+F5)

Inserts current system date using the short date format specified in the Local Settings (e.g. Control Panel of My Computer).

See also Date, Date/Time, Time/Date, Long Date, Long Date/Time and Time/Long Date.

Long Date (Ctrl+Shift+F5)

Inserts current system date using the long date format specified in the Local Settings (e.g. Control Panel of My Computer).

See also Date, Date/Time, Time/Date, Long Date, Long Date/Time and Time/Long Date.

Go to.. (Ctrl+G)

Shows the Go to dialog and then moves the caret to a specified line or location, optionally selecting text along.

Use either Go to Line button to move to specified Line, or Go to Position button to move to specified Position instead.

Note: Zero and negative numbers can be used as both Line and Position.

  • Zero Line means the last line of the document; and negative Line number means how many lines to go from the last line upwards, e.g. Line -1 means the penultimate line.
  • Zero Position means the end of the document, after the very last character; and negative Position means how many characters to go from the end of the document upwards, e.g. Position -1 means before the last character.

Jump relatively option can be used to move the caret relatively to the current position.

Select leaped text option can be used to select text that lies between the current position and the new specified location. If there is some text already selected, the selection is extended only. Note: If the specified location is inside the current selection while Select leaped text option is turned on, the selection is not modified at all.

Tip: Combination of Jump relatively and Select leaped text options can be used to easily select text of specific length.

Select Word (Ctrl+D)

Selects entire word, all white-spaces, or a single character otherwise, according to what begins or continues to the right from the actual insertion point. If there was a selection before, it is discarded before new selection is made. If this feature is used subsequently multiple times, the selection crawls through the document, word by word.

Note: Using Add Next Word (hotkey Ctrl+Shift+D) adds the next word to the current selection instead moving it.

See also Select Line, Select Paragraph, Select Word, Select All. See also Add Next Line, Add Next Paragraph, Add Next Word.

Add Next Word (Ctrl+Shift+D)

Adds entire word, all white-spaces, or a single character otherwise, to the selection, according to what begins or continues to the right from the actual insertion point. If this feature is used subsequently multiple times, the selection is extended through the document, word by word.

Note: Using Select Word (hotkey Ctrl+D) moves the selection to the next word instead of extending it.

See also Select Line, Select Paragraph, Select Word, Select All. See also Add Next Line, Add Next Paragraph, Add Next Word.

Select Line (Ctrl+Num*)

Selects entire current line, including following newline, if any. If a line is already selected, automatically moves and selects the next line.

Note: Using Add Next Line (hotkey Ctrl+Shift+Num*) adds the next line to the current selection instead moving it.

See also Select Line, Select Paragraph, Select Word, Select All. See also Add Next Line, Add Next Paragraph, Add Next Word.

Add Next Line (Ctrl+Shift+Num*)

Adds entire current line to the selection, including following newline, if any. If a line is already selected, including the following newline, automatically adds the next one.

Note: Using Select Line (hotkey Ctrl+Num*) moves the selection to the next line instead of extending it.

See also Select Line, Select Paragraph, Select Word, Select All. See also Add Next Line, Add Next Paragraph, Add Next Word.

Select Paragraph (Ctrl+Num/)

Selects entire current paragraph, including following empty lines, if any. If a paragraph is already selected, automatically moves and selects the next paragraph.

Note: Using Add Next Paragraph (hotkey Ctrl+Shift+Num/) adds the next paragraph to the current selection instead moving it.

See also Select Line, Select Paragraph, Select Word, Select All. See also Add Next Line, Add Next Paragraph, Add Next Word.

Add Next Paragraph (Ctrl+Shift+Num/)

Adds entire current paragraph to the selection, including following empty lines, if any. If a paragraph is already selected, including all the following empty lines, automatically adds the next one.

Note: Using Select Paragraph (hotkey Ctrl+Num/) moves the selection to the next paragraph instead of extending it.

See also Select Line, Select Paragraph, Select Word, Select All. See also Add Next Line, Add Next Paragraph, Add Next Word.

Select All (Ctrl+A)

Selects all text in the document.

See also Select Line, Select Word, Select Paragraph.

Delete Line (Alt+Del)

Deletes the entire current line.

Note: If there is any selection, it is deleted instead.

See also Cut off Word, Cut off Line, BkSpace Word and BkSpace Line.

Cut off Word (Ctrl+Del)

Deletes characters to the right from the caret, upto the end of the current word.

Note: A word is either a sequence of word characters, sequence of white-spaces, or one non-word character.

Note: If there is any selection, it is deleted instead.

See also Cut off Line, BkSpace Word, BkSpace Line and Delete Line.

Cut off Line (Ctrl+Shift+Del)

Deletes characters to the right from the caret, upto the end of the current line.

Note: If there is any selection, it is deleted instead.

Versions note: Cut off Line works regardless of current word wrapping, in versions above 6.0. Prior to version 6.0, Cut off Line deleted the line only upto the next line wrapping point.

Versions note: Cut off Line deletes the selection only, if there is a selection, in versions above 6.0. Prior to version 6.0, Cut off Line deleted the selection and line(s) around it together.

See also Cut off Word, BkSpace Word, BkSpace Line and Delete Line.

BkSpace Word (Ctrl+BkSpace)

Deletes characters to the left from the caret, upto the beginning of the current word.

Note: A word is either a sequence of word characters, sequence of white-spaces, or one non-word character.

Note: If there is any selection, it is deleted instead.

Obcas mam pocit, ze pisem uplne predpokladatelne veci o veciach, ktore su i tak vsetkym intuitivne jasne. Zaujimalo by ma, co bezny uzivatel pochopi z toho, co som zo seba prave vypotil... :-)

See also Cut off Word, Cut off Line, BkSpace Line and Delete Line.

BkSpace Line (Ctrl+Shift+BkSpace)

Deletes characters to the left from the caret, upto the beginning of the current line.

Note: If there is any selection, it is deleted instead.

Versions note: BkSpace Line works regardless of current word wrapping, in versions above 6.0. Prior to version 6.0, BkSpace Line deleted the line only upto the previous line wrapping point.

Versions note: BkSpace Line deletes the selection only, if there is a selection, in versions above 6.0. Prior to version 6.0, BkSpace Line deleted the selection and line(s) around it together.

See also Cut off Word, Cut off Line, BkSpace Word and Delete Line.

Push Line Up (Alt+Ctrl+Up) (Alt+Ctrl+Shift+Up)

Selects the current whole line and moves it upwards, i.e. removing it from its current location and placing it before the previous line. In case several lines are selected, the selection is first extended to cover whole these lines, and then they are conveniently moved as one.

Tip: The Alt+Ctrl+Up moves the line upwards by one line. The Alt+Ctrl+Shift+Up moves the line upwards by 10 lines at once.

Note: The newline following the line being moved is part of the line and is moved along with the line. This might be interesting in case of a file with mixed newlines, where one might care that newlines are not modified. However, upon moving the very last line, there is no newline after it. In such specific case, the newline dividing the two lines being interchanged is re-used.

Push Line Down (Alt+Ctrl+Down) (Alt+Ctrl+Shift+Down)

Selects the current whole line and moves it downwards, i.e. removing it from its current location and placing it after the following line. In case several lines are selected, the selection is first extended to cover whole these lines, and then they are conveniently moved as one.

Tip: The Alt+Ctrl+Down moves the line downwards by one line. The Alt+Ctrl+Shift+Down moves the line downwards by 10 lines at once.

Note: The newline following the line being moved is part of the line and is moved along with the line. This might be interesting in case of a file with mixed newlines, where one might care that newlines are not modified. However, upon moving to the very last line, there is no newline after the very last line. In such specific case, the newline dividing the two lines being interchanged is re-used.

Smart Return (Ctrl+Enter)

Auto-indents text after inserting a line break (i.e. newline) by replicating all white-spaces from the first non-empty line above.

Tip: Smart Return can be used on empty lines as well, for example to catch-up with indentation from previous lines after inserting a few empty lines.

Note: Usually, within this manual, a non-empty line means a line that contains no graphs. This is, however, not the case with this feature. Smart Return always replicates white-spaces from the first line above, which is of non-zero length.

Versions note: Smart Return works regardless of current word wrapping, in versions above 5.0. Prior to version 5.0, Smart Return worked with previous line according to actual word wrapping.

See also Copying Return.

Copying Return (Ctrl+Shift+Enter)

After inserting a line break (i.e. newline), copies all characters from the first non-empty line above. This effectively duplicates the line.

Note: Usually, within this manual, a non-empty line means a line that contains no graphs. This is, however, not the case with this feature. Copying Return always replicates characters from the first line above, which is of non-zero length.

Tip: You can use Copying Return also in the middle of a line, though the results might appear a bit confusing at the first glance. Since a newline is inserted first and only then the copying of characters occurs, it is the same as if one first broke the line manually by simple Return key, and then used the Copying Return at the beginning of that new line. It takes some practise to learn how to use this feature effectively, but it pays off.

See also Smart Return.

Complete Word (Ctrl+Space)

Tries to complete current word according to dictionary calculated from the current document.

Takes the word just before the caret as a pattern and then searches the entire document for any suitable words, which begin with such pattern. Suitable words are uniqued and either auto-completed or displayed in a Complete Word list to be chosen for completion.

Note: The document must already contain word hello to be able to complete hel to hello. No external dictionary is currently used.

Note: No selection is allowed. If invoked inside a word, only the preceding part of this word is taken as a pattern.

Longest auto-completion

By default, if there is more than one word suitable for completion, but all suitable words share a common continuation part, it is automatically completed and no list is brought up. This can, of course, be turned off by Complete Word: Longest auto-completion setting in the Settings dialog. If turned off, the Complete Word list always appears, as long as there are at least two suitable words. See chapter Edit page of the Settings dialog.

Tip: Longest auto-completion can be superior over displaying list, if desired words appear in many morphemes. Type the first few letters, then use the auto-completion to roll out the common root of the word, then type in the suffix. It is usually a bit faster to type the suffix then choosing it from a list. Also, completion dialogs and word lists tend to slow users down, since one's focus is constantly diverted from the text itself to the dialogs. Using longest auto-completion reduces the need for dialogs with word list, as long as one is eager to type after each longest auto-completion use.

Tip: Longest auto-completion can become quite a good friend in programming code. Suppose you use function names a lot, which tend to share common parts of names, e.g. ListPlayers, ListEnemies, ListPlaymates. Type L and have it quickly auto-completed to List. Then type E and have it finished to ListEnemies — that's only 4 keystrokes. Or type P and have the List auto-completed to ListPlay. Then with either e or m finalize it to ListPlayers or ListPlaymates respectively — that's still only 6 keystrokes. Longest auto-completion is much smarter and faster than choosing from lists every time.

Ignoring Case

Suitable words are chosen in case sensitive way by default. This can, however, be modified by Complete Word: Ignore case setting in the Settings dialog. See chapter Edit page of the Settings dialog.

Note: Suitable words are always uniqued in a case sensitive way, even if Complete Word: Ignore case setting is turned on. Thus both Hello and hello might appear in the Complete Word list.

Sort suggestions

Suitable words appear in the Complete Word list in the same order, in which they are found within the document, while going up from the caret position. E.g. If typing what a word can do to the world and then trying to complete w in the next sentence, suitable words would appear as: world, word and what. To sort suitable words alphabetically, use the Complete Word: Sort suggestions setting in the Settings dialog. See chapter Edit page of the Settings dialog.

See also Complete Line.

Complete Line (Ctrl+Shift+Space)

Tries to complete one word on current line according to similar lines within the document.

Takes the current line (its portion before the caret) as a pattern and then searches upwards thru the entire document for any suitable lines. The word to complete is then taken from the first suitable line found. A line is considered suitable, if it begins with the same text as the current line upto the positon of the caret.

In other words, a line is found in the document, which begins with the same text as the current line. One word is then added to the current line to lengthen it, keeping both lines the same upto that word.

Tip: The line, from which the word to be completed is taken, must begin exactly the same as the current line. Even white-spaces are considered. Take advantage of this if coding source code. Use indentation to tell, which line you wish to copy the word from. The first line above that matches the indentation will be chosen. Note: It takes some practise to learn how to use this effectively while coding, but once you get a grip on it, it pays off big time.

Note: Complete Line always works with unwrapped lines, even if word wrapping is turned on.

Note: Complete Line always searches for lines in case sensitive way.

Tip: If writing a list, and each of the lines starts with the same phrase (e.g. I would like to), use the Complete Line at the beginning of each line. Hit Ctrl+Shift+Space hotkey several times, until you reach the position where lines starts to differ. Since Complete Line only completes one word at a time, typing some letters from time to time between Ctrl+Shift+Space hotkeys may help to concretize, which line the next word is to be taken from. This may save a lot of typing and/or copy-pasting.

Consider a list like this:
I would like to go to Australia. I would hate to get fired. I would like to release new version. I would not like to get sick. I would

At the last line of the example, using Complete Line would result in completing not and later on like to get sick. However, if letter l or letter h is typed first, then Complete Line results in completing like or hate instead. Further, after choosing like, there is a point where letter g or letter r can be typed to further distinguish between go and release continuations.

See also Complete Word.

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